Répondre

de Ste Croix DNA

ydestecroix
female
Messages : 5
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
Hello

Are there any other male members of the de Ste Croix family who have carried out a DNA test?  My eldest brother had his DNA tested by Oxford Ancestors in 2005.  The result  was that my brother carries a Y-chromosome recognised as being of probable Anglo Saxon or Danish Viking origin.  Interestingly, my grandfather told us that the de Ste Croix family was descended from Vikings and that it was information that had been passed down through the family.

Yvonne de Ste Croix


rootpursuit
rootpursuit
Messages : 4
Yvonne,
There are different types of DNA tests that a person can take. Each type of test gives you a different piece of information. It can be quite revealing to find others with your same paternal lineage with regard to tracing your ancestors. If I were you, I would take into consideration that others may share the paternal line, that have a different last name. Generally speaking, Scandinavian heritage didn't pass down the exact surname. Their surnames changed in every generation, for example, Soren Larrson his son's surname would be Sorenson. If his name was Eric Sorenson, his son's last name would be Ericson.

Also, until the turn of the 20th century, the 1900's - people weren't so concerned about surname spelling. Name spellings varied from siblings and from generation to generation.

So where does that leave you? If I were you, I would have your brother go back to the source of where he had his DNA test and see if there are any matches in the database. I can't guarantee that they won't charge a fee, but it's worth a try!

Thanks and good luck to you!
Kelly E. Lee @www.root-pursuit.com

ydestecroix
female
Messages : 5
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
Hello Kelly
I’ve been tracing my de Ste Croix family history since 1970s.  I’ve been in contact with people of that name in Canada, USA, UK and across the world before the existence of the Internet.  I’ve also visited the archives in Jersey, Channel Islands many times, where the name was first recorded in 1205 and I’ve got my direct line back to the 1560s.  All my research is based on fact (unlike many of the trees seen on Ancestry).

My brother did the Oxford Ancestors’ DNA tests, both mitochondrial and Y-chromosome in 2005.  The latter showed he descended either from Anglo Saxon or Danish Viking.  The additional information about where the family comes from shows that it is the Viking line.  As you know the Vikings occupied Normandy and northern France from the late 800s and the Channel Islands at that time would have been part of their territory (these were the Normans who invaded England under William).  The OA database includes a facility for matching others with the same DNA profile.  However, nobody else matches my brothers DNA, hence the reason for my original query. 

Thank you for your information concerning Scandinavian surnames; I think you will realise from the research I have completed that name changes have not happened in my family.  Since the huge increase in information on the Internet, I have been able to link my family to those who had their origins in northern France and they, like many others, intermarried with the Normans.
Kind regards.
Yvonne


rootpursuit
rootpursuit
Messages : 4
Yvonne,
I agree about Ancestry.com and its family trees  most of the time they are just a list of names without any evidence to back it up. Ancestry.com has a tremendous amount of primary resources, but it definitely isn't the only place to find primary sources on the internet. Every day people are adding more and more digital documentation to databases. As they scan documents into software programs that can actually index itself because it can read text and hand-written materials. Universities are especially investing in this software, so many have wonderful databases full of primary sources. It can be tedious to drill down into the layers of information, but it can be done with enough patience. Large libraries and the government are also using this software and making the information available on the web. I am currently enrollled in a university that allows me access into many of these databases that usually require membership or school enrollment to access. Small libraries often have their micro-databases that also include primary sources or indexes of primary sources on their library website. A super tool to gather information before heading down to the library!

Anyway, I am just wondering if the Oxford Ancestors cross-checked their database for DNA profiles, but then if there is a way for them to also cross-check all of the DNA genealogy databases. There are so many companies that do DNA genealogy testing - it would be a shame if they didn't have some kind of central database for checking all profiles.

Thanks, Kelly

ydestecroix
female
Messages : 5
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
Hello Kelly

I agree that there needs to be a central database for cross checking all profiles.  My husband, who is also tracing his family history, did ask Oxford Ancestors, but the reply wasn't clear.    Perhaps someone can advise us?

Regards.

Yvonne

rootpursuit
rootpursuit
Messages : 4
Yvonne,
"Family Tree DNA" now claims to have 90% of genealogy related DNA records in the world -  in their database.

http://www.familytreedna.com/

If the claim is true, then the odds would definitely be in your favor. That would explain why you didn't get a straight answer from the Oxford Folks - not wanting to help the competition. It's a shame because Oxford was the forerunner to this technology.

Thanks,
Kelly

ydestecroix
female
Messages : 5
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
Hello Kelly

What "Family Tree DNA" actually says is that 90% of genealogists choose them and that they have the largest DNA database.  I would presume that the majority of users are in the USA.  We've looked at both FT DNA and Oxford Ancestors' Y-chromosome marker tests.  OA now do 15 markers and FT DNA 12 markers; they include the same set (when we did ours, OA were only doing 10 markers).  It would appear, therefore, that the FT DNA database would be compatible with the tests we have done.  However, there are some questions about accuracy and reproducability to which I don't have the answer.  For example, if I sent 10 samples of the same DNA to a lab would I get 10 identical results?  If I sent DNA samples to serveral labs who tested the same markers, would I get the same results?  By the way, at those prices I'm not going to do it......!  FT DNA claim to be compatible with National Georgraphic Study and results can be included at a price.

My husband's Y-DNA has 760 matches on the Oxford Ancestors database, whilst my brother's has none; hence the original post.  OA is a very professional outfit and is based on the extensive research work that Professor Bryan Sykes has done as an anthropologist; it is not just a money-making concern.  Have you read his latest book, "DNA USA; a Genetic Portrait of America"?  At the moment only available on Kindle, not in hardback. 

Regards

Yvonne   

rootpursuit
rootpursuit
Messages : 4
Yvonne,
Family Tree DNA does say that 90% of genealogists choose them, and I am not really sure how they are defining genealogists, but that wasn't the information I was citing.

  See the following website: http://www.worldfamilies.net/retest
[quote]

OA is - without a doubt - not as commercialized as Family Tree DNA. Anyway, I have read parts of "DNA USA" and I am fascinated with the concepts that Sykes presents. I was first introduced to Bryan Sykes (not in person) through the sensationalist article on the black British couple who gave birth to a white child. He was one of the interviewed experts on the story, which led me to do more research on him.

The genetic makeup of America is far more diverse than the general population could fathom. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. - of whom I am a huge fan - is consistently finding ways to reinforce the insignificance of race and skin color. I couldn't agree more! I must say that when my father had his DNA tested - a few years before he passed away (which was 2008), he just had the test that shows the origination of his paternal line. I would love to have known the results of an autosomal test.  :(

Best of luck in your searching!!
Kelly Lee

Répondre

Revenir à « DNA - Genetic Genealogy »