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Before going with DNA testing

kezbekistan
female
Messages : 1
Saisie : Standard
Voir son arbre
I take your point, S.
But when it comes down to it, isn't family beyond genes in many cases?
In case of adoption, the adoptee has all the rights and privileges of a natural born child.
It's still your family, even if it's not your blood.
that's assuming there hasn't been a crossing of the wires with tracing back your lineage.
Imagine my headaches tracing the Dean family in an area thoroughly saturated with huge families of Deans, at a time when Fred (for example) was a popular christian name  ::)
Much easier with family members called Cinderella or Priscilla, even if the surname is Lee or Smith  :)

nannettew
nannettew
Messages : 3
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
I'm beginning to think that may be happening in my family.  The way I think about it though is that I would like to find out.  Maybe the DNA will lead me to my real ancestors.  I've spent a lot of time on the paper trail, but that is wasted if the DNA trail is wrong.  So I want to find out one way or the other. I don't think I will be upset ... I think I will be relieved.

cdelicata
male
Messages : 70
myredvw a écrit :
01 juillet 2010, 01:25
Are you really prepared for what 'surprises' may confront you?
Having researched a family for years, and being very sure of the lineage - a DNA test showed NO connection to that surname!
Totally devastating. The only person I can figure where this could have happened would be 3 or 4 generations back - where I have NO way of finding out the truth.
What to do.  VERY hurt and what a blow to enjoyment of genealogy research. WHO of us knows the truth, beyond a shodow of doubt, about EVERY birth in our ancestry?
S.
Is it possible that there are more than one genetic result for the same surname? I guess that would be very likely for a name that is derived from a trade e.g. smith ?

jluoma
jluoma
Messages : 8
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
Kezbekistan....  Thank you for mentioning “Adoptee Rights”, as it provided an opportunity...

It is a common belief held by those who are not closely affected by adoption, that an adopted child enjoys the same rights as a natural child, and in the case of the family, that can be the case.  But, in one serious way it is incorrect.  And, I hope that when those not affected by adoption know the reality, they will help change the rules.

As currently, in the United States, many states do not allow an adult adoptee access to their original birth certificate, as information as to their birth parents is sealed.  And, in some states, the seal cannot be broken even for medical reasons by the court. 

In the age of DNA and the realization of the importance of genetic information in early detection/treatment of serious illnesses, and that there is an emotional impact of “not knowing who you really are”, it is unreal that these states still refuse to change the rule. 

Judy Luoma

nannettew
nannettew
Messages : 3
Saisie : Geneweb
Voir son arbre
I so agree that all people should be able to view their birth certificates.  At least when they get to be an adult ,,,  and especially in cases of inherited diseases and possible treatments.

cdelicata
male
Messages : 70
myredvw a écrit :
01 juillet 2010, 01:25
Are you really prepared for what 'surprises' may confront you?
Having researched a family for years, and being very sure of the lineage - a DNA test showed NO connection to that surname!
Totally devastating. The only person I can figure where this could have happened would be 3 or 4 generations back - where I have NO way of finding out the truth.
What to do.  VERY hurt and what a blow to enjoyment of genealogy research. WHO of us knows the truth, beyond a shodow of doubt, about EVERY birth in our ancestry?
S.
Is it possible that there are more than one genetic result for the same surname? It is possible for people of the same surname to not be related at all. I guess that would be very likely for a name that is derived from a trade e.g. smith ?

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