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Genealogy Blog

30 June 2014

National Library of India Graveyard for Rare Books and Newspapers

National Library of India, which could have been a repository of priceless books and documents, has turned into a dumping ground. The roof of the new section -built at a cost of Rs 148 crore just nine years ago -has started leaking forcing employees to cover treasured books with tarpaulin.

Sources in the museum told TOI that rare books are being ripped apart, page by page, in the name of digital scanning and the original copies dumped like waste material.

Source & Full Story

How To Start Your Family History

So you have decided to start your family history. Good idea!

The first task is to collect basic information about your close family members.

Ask your relatives about names, dates and places, photograph or scan family pictures and papers, and search online databases.

Continue reading...

27 June 2014

Historic Torrington, Connecticut, Photos Unearthed Ahead of Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary June 27

Research in advance of a screening of a PBS documentary on Frederick Law Olmsted has unearthed 250 photographs of the city in the early 1900s.

According to a release from the Torrington Historical Society, Edward Cannata, a volunteer at the Society, uncovered the photographs at a Massachusetts archive while researching Frederick Law Olmsted’s involvement with the city.

Source & Full Story

26 June 2014

Toronto Star Donates More than One Million Archive Photos to Public Library

The Toronto Star is donating more than one million vintage photographs — the contents of the Star's entire photo archive — to the Toronto Public Library.

The images span the years 1900 to 1999, and offer a unique glimpse into how the city has changed and developed throughout the last century. Toronto Star publisher John Cruickshank says the Toronto Public Library is "an extraordinary city institution," and will be a great place for the collection.

Source & Full Story

British Boy on School Trip to German War Cemetery in France Captures Ghostly Image of a Scottish Regiment Soldier on his Mobile Phone

A teenage boy claims he has managed to capture a ‘guardian ghost’ on his phone at a Great War cemetery in France.

Mitch Glover, 14, from Leamington Spa, was visiting the Neuville-St Vaast German war cemetery near Arras, in northern France, during a school trip when he took a photograph of the ‘ghost’. Not until after the school boy came home, did he notice the eerie figure in one of his pictures, which he says looks like a man wearing the uniform of a Scottish regiment.

Source & Full Story

25 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Arlington National Cemetery Explorer 2.0.9 (Mobile - Freeware)

• Bug fixes - issues with Find a Grave not returning results.

Brother's Keeper 7.0.20 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• If you are adding a Source and you select an existing source, then you change something that is not the Abbreviation and click Close and pick 'Change only for one person' it was giving error 'duplicate master source'. This has been fixed.

GedView 3.4.2 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Support CEME fact.
• iOS 7 support.
• Trees now make use of file system encryption to better protect your data.
• Updated map view.
• Fixes failed searches for place names.

Genealone 1.2.1 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Several bugs have been fixed.
• Genealone can download GEDCOM file from the web, now,
• Genealone can import huge GEDCOM files with tens of thousands persons, now.
• Data import has been improved.
• Few design improvements.
• Swedish translation.

GRAMPS 4.1.0 (Full Featured - Linux - Freeware/Open Source)

• New Tags support on Event, Place, Repository, Source, and Citation.
• Source/Citation Data becomes Attributes.
• New place hierarchies model.
• By default, you can choose navigator modes with a drop down.
• New Place editor.

HuMo-gen 5.0.4 (Web Publishing - Windows - Freeware)

• New: Person, places and sources indexes: renewed lay-out. Index in table with a new headline for sort options.
• New: For Pro-gen: birth and decease witnesses are read and shown.
• New: Person index: it's now possible to search for profession, zip-code, living place, witnesses and text by person (in extended search).
• New: Replaced "Elegant green" theme by the new theme "Green Field".
• Many improvements and fixes.

MacFamilyTree 7.2 (Full Featured - Mac - Purchase)

• Completely rewritten Reports.
• Improved Interactive Tree.
• Improved FamilySearch integration.
• Refined user interface.
• Improved search function in the person list sidebar.
• New startup window.
• Major performance enhancements in all edit sections.
• Better scrolling behaviour when using a third-party mouse.

MobileFamilyTree 7.2 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Same changes as in MacFamilyTree.

South Wales Archives To Join Collection of Worldwide Historically Important Documents

Archives from South Wales are to sit alongside the Domesday Book and Winston Churchill's papers in a project which collects documents of historical importance from across the globe.

The Unesco Memory of the World programme is building a list of documents of specific historical or cultural significance and the UK register features the writings by Britain's wartime leader, as well as the death warrant signed by Parliament that cost Charles I his head.

Source & Full Story

Dead WWII Soldiers Found Buried in Brabant, Netherlands

The remains of two soldiers from the Second World War have been found in the Overdiepse Polder on the Maas river in Brabant. The Salvave and Identification service from the Army has announced this today. The bodies were dug up on Friday.

Some people were on the polder near Waspik with a metal detector on Thursday, and discovered the bones. The Army was then called in by the police.

Source & Full Story

Spanish Documents Suggest Irish Arrived in America Before Columbus

While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey.

“Researchers feel certain that there was a colony of Irish folk living in what is now South Carolina, when Christopher Columbus “thought” he had discovered the New World,” writes Richard Thornton for The Examiner.

Source & Full Story

24 June 2014

Oldest Known Irish Manuscript To Be Exhibited Publicly

The oldest known surviving Irish manuscript will be among a number of works to be exhibited publicly for the first time in 2016, after Trinity College Dublin secured funding for a major conservation project.

The Codex Usserianius Primus, or First Book of Ussher, is an incomplete copy of the four Gospels on vellum, which may have been created as early as the 5th century, several centuries earlier than the Book of Kells.

Source & Full Story

Scotland: 15th Century Copy of Battle of Bannockburn Poem Restored

A copy of a poem revealing the details of the Battle of Bannockburn has been restored for the 700th anniversary of the battle. "The Brus" is believed to have been written by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen in 1375 and tells of Robert the Bruce's wars for Scottish independence.

The battle was fought on June 23 and 24 in 1314 and is relived through the 1,400-line poem. Now, a 15th century copy of the poem has been restored by a team at St John's College at Cambridge University.

Source & Full Story

23 June 2014

Many Czech WWI Graves Neglected, Says Member of History Buffs' Group

A hundred years ago, the world was about to be plunged into a conflict whose impact can still be felt today in many parts of the globe. Indeed, the creation of independent Czechoslovakia was only made possible by the defeat of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

However, around one million Czechs fought in World War I in Austro-Hungarian uniforms, and tens of thousands died on a broad stretch of territory from northern Italy to Ukraine and Poland.

Source & Full Story

Match Your GeneaNet Family Tree

Club Privilege members can automatically match their family tree with the entire GeneaNet database. This feature automatically searches for new ancestors in your family tree.

Match your family tree with just one click or select the Advanced mode to get full access to all settings.

Non-Club Privilege members can automatically match surnames & places (not the first names) in their family tree with the entire GeneaNet database.

Continue reading...

20 June 2014

Remains of American WWII Soldiers Found in Vietnam

American experts identified the remains of two American servicemen who went missing in action during World War 2 (1939-1945) during a preliminary examination in Ho Chi Minh City on June 17.

If the findings prove accurate, this will be the first time the remains of US soldiers who went missing in action during WWII have been recovered in Vietnam.

Source & Full Story

Historic Slave Cemetery Bulldozed In Houston

The historic Bradshaw Cemetery in Houston, Texas was bulldozed without its owners consent and now the family is searching for answers.

Bradshaw, a cemetery dating back to the 1800s and owned by the Nelloms family, was the final resting place for the "bodies of slaves and African Americans who fought in wars and were denied a proper burial…and the family who owns the land say they don’t even know who is responsible."

Source & Full Story

Dracula's Tomb Found in Italy? Er...Not Really

Has the tomb of Vlad III the Impaler, the historical Dracula, been found in the center of Naples in Italy? Not really. Experts and bloggers are now debunking the claim that circulated late last week, saying it’s not rooted in real history but rather resembles a Da Vinci Code conspiracy novel.

According to a report in the Italian daily Il Mattino, the remains of the 15th century Romanian prince upon which Bram Stoker's gothic novel "Dracula" is based, lie in a cloister in the Santa Maria La Nova church in Naples.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Nicole Kidman?

Nicole Kidman was born on June 20, 1967, in Honolulu, Hawaii, while her Australian parents were temporarily in the United States on educational visas. Kidman can therefore claim citizenship in Australia and the United States.

Her father, Antony David Kidman, is a biochemist, clinical psychologist, and author. Her mother, Janelle Ann (née Glenny), is a nursing instructor who edits her husband's books and was a member of the Women's Electoral Lobby. Kidman's ancestry includes Scottish and Irish.

Nicole Kidman's Family Tree

17 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.19 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Fixed a problem when adding a new Note to a person on the Edit screen, and then changing it from Individual to Family and then clicking Edit to change the note.
• Fixed a problem where the descendant Tree chart would sometimes not print a person's name at the top of some pages.

GEDexplorer 1.4 (Applications pour mobiles - Mobile - Purchase)

• Added menu option to close the file.

DNA Testing Finally Identifies Soldier Killed in Korean War

A Kentucky family is preparing to bury a Korean War veteran's remains, which were recently identified through DNA testing after decades of uncertainty.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports the remains of Sgt. Paul M. Gordon will return to the U.S. on Tuesday and will be interred Friday at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North in Williamstown. Gordon joined the Army in 1949 and was sent to the Korean conflict, where he died in a prisoner of war camp in 1951 at the age of 20.

Source & Full Story

Ashes of WWII Chinese Soldiers from Burma Buried in Yunnan

Twenty-two urns containing the ashes of soldiers from the Chinese Expeditionary Forces who fought against the Japanese during World War II were transported from Burma and reburied in China’s Yunnan Province last week.

In 1942, two brigades of Chinese soldiers from the Chinese Expeditionary Forces were part of the Allied Forces led by US commander Gen Joseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell.

Source & Full Story

16 June 2014

Dickinson Museum Center Creates Online Collection with 8,000 Photos; Thousands More Yet To Be Processed

In the 1930s, when Dickinson’s college was literally out of town — separated from the city by open spaces and a now long-gone golf course — amateur and professional photographers were taking pictures of those and other sights.

Now, those thousands of images, some 19th century, but mostly 20th-century — everything from landscapes to Dickinson businesses, to wedding pictures, team photos and ranchers at work — have landed on one spot on the Internet.

Source & Full Story

Geneanet Retires Its Old Family Tree Software

On June 30, 2014, Geneanet will retire its old family tree software and all the members will have to use the new one.

Some months ago, we have released a new family tree software. It's not only faster and easier to use, but it's also more effective in ways that our users have been requesting. Since then, the old family tree software was still available.

This transitional period will expire on June 30, 2014, and all the Geneanet members will have to use the new family tree software.

15 June 2014

Are You Related to Waylon Jennings?

Waylon Arnold Jennings was born on June 15, 1937 in Littlefield, Texas, the seat of Lamb County, the son of Lorene Beatrice (née Shipley) and William Albert Jennings.

His original birth name was Wayland, meaning land by the highway, but it was changed after a Baptist preacher visited Jennings's parents and congratulated his mother for naming him after the Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, Texas.

Waylon Jennings' Family Tree

13 June 2014

Genes Found in Nature Yield 1918-Like Virus with Pandemic Potential

An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus.

Searching public databases, the researchers, led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, identified eight genes from influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks that possessed remarkable genetic similarities to the genes that made up the 1918 pandemic flu virus.

Source & Full Story

Pre-1989 Communist Documents To Be Transferred To National Archives of Hungary

The Institute of Political History (PTI) will have to transfer its archives stemming from the period 1944-1989 to the National Archives as the Kuria, Hungary’s supreme court, rejected the institute’s appeal on Wednesday, national dailies Nepszabadsag and Nepszava said on Thursday.

The archives concerned contain the documents of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party and its predecessors, other left-wing political and social organisations as well as trade unions.

Source & Full Story

Family Tree DNA Reaches a Historic Milestone: Over 1,000,000 DNA Tests Processed

This historic amount includes Family Tree DNA’s tests as well the processing of public participation samples for National Geographic’s Genographic Project. Family Tree DNA is the Genographic Project’s genetic testing partner.

The million-test milestone was reached this week during the company’s Father’s Day sale, which includes the Family Finder test currently discounted at the affordable price of $79.

Source & Full Story

Tuam Mother and Baby Home: The Trouble with the Septic Tank Story

"I never used that word 'dumped'," Catherine Corless, a local historian in Co Galway, tells The Irish Times. "I never said to anyone that 800 bodies were dumped in a septic tank. That did not come from me at any point. They are not my words."

The story that emerged from her work was reported this week in dramatic headlines around the world. Corless, who lives outside Tuam, has been working for several years on records associated with the former St Mary’s mother-and-baby home in the town. Her research has revealed that 796 children, most of them infants, died between 1925 and 1961, the 36 years that the home, run by Bon Secours, existed.

Source & Full Story

12 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Family Get-To-Gether (Free) 1.2.1 (Mobile - Freeware)

• New option added to export descendant/ancestors tree and new option to export photos along with GEDCOM file.
• New option to export (or print) tree. Go to ’Tree’ page, press ‘Menu’ button, and select ‘Export’. 3rd party app required for print.
• New option to export members photos. Go to ‘My Families’ page, long-press on a family and select ‘Export GEDCOM’. Check ‘Export Photos’ option.
• Larger font is used in ‘Tree’ page for large display.
• Miscellaneous quality enhancements.

GEDexplorer 1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Improved error checking for reading dates and note records.

Genealone 1.2 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Person edit form improved.
• New: Mapping.
• New: Custom HTML pages linkable to persons.
• New: Merging persons.
• New: Merging and editing places.
• New: Main menu configuration tool.
• New: New Places section.

My Family Tree 3.0.20.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Removed the limit to the number of events which can be displayed in the timeline view.
• Fixed issue loading newly created files.

The Complete Genealogy Reporter 2014 build 140606 (Family Books - Windows - Shareware)

• The translations for "From" and "To" (dates) were absent for a number of languages, resulting in no qualifier being reported. This affected reports created in Catalan, Danish, Spanish, Finnish, French, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian and Portuguese. These qualifiers are now translated and reported correctly.
• URL references to image files in GEDCOM files created by Ancestry.com are now ignored because these incorrectly reference a web page, not the remotely stored image file. This avoids the very slow loading of such GEDCOM files.

Top 100 Irish Last Names Explained

IrishCentral.com has put together a list of the top 100 common Irish surnames with a little explanation of where these names come from. Whether you're looking to trace your family crest or trying to trace your family roots this list will point you in the right direction.

From Aherne to Whelan here is this top 100 Irish names: Aherne - (Ó hEachtighearna/Ó hEachthairn) (each, steed tightearna, lord). Originally Dalcassian, this sept migrated from east Clare to Co. Cork. In County Waterford the English name Hearn is a synonym of Hearn.

Source & Full Story

11 June 2014

Queens Abolitionist's Tombstone Mysteriously Appears in Professor's Yard

A Queens College professor returning home from vacation found a mysterious gravestone laying in his yard and was set to break it into pieces when he realized how special it was. Allan Rudman says he got back to his Flushing home last week to find the gravestone sitting by his fence. As a geologist, he initially planned to hit it with a hammer and break it into pieces.

The gravestone was that of famous abolitionist Wilson Rantus, who died in 1861. He was a free middle-class black man who lived in Queens in the 1800s.

Source & Full Story

10 June 2014

Earliest Known Portrait of an African-American Slave Comes to US

A rare oil painting of an African slave from circa 1733 has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, which runs the history museums at the Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. The portrait is one of a pair of paintings by William Hoare of Bath that shows the earliest known depictions of an African slave in the American colonies.

The portrait depicts Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, an educated African from a prominent family of Muslim clerics who was kidnapped on the Gambia River in 1731 and sold into slavery in colonial Maryland.

Source & Full Story

'Incredibly Important' Medieval Find in Wales

Archaeologists says they have discovered an "incredibly important" medieval convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion in Ceredigion. The location of Llanllyr nunnery in the Aeron Valley had been a mystery until now.

The convent, founded by Lord Rhys ap Gruffudd in 1180, was a daughter house of the Strata Florida abbey, a former Cistercian monastery which was of immense importance to Wales during the Middle Ages.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Judy Garland?

Born Frances Ethel Gumm on June 10, 1922, in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Garland was the youngest child of Ethel Marion (née Milne; November 17, 1893 – January 5, 1953) and Francis Avent "Frank" Gumm (March 20, 1886 – November 17, 1935). Her parents were vaudevillians who settled in Grand Rapids to run a movie theatre that featured vaudeville acts.

Named after both her parents and baptized at a local Episcopal church, "Baby" (as she was called by her parents and sisters) shared her family's flair for song and dance.

Judy Garland's Family Tree

9 June 2014

10th-Century Viking king May Have Been Discovered in Scotland

In 2005 archaeologists working in eastern Scotland came across the skeleton of a warrior buried in a saint’s cemetery. A historian now believes these might be the remains of Olaf Guthfrithsson, King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941.

The remains were uncovered in the village of Auldhame, East Lothian, which is home to an Anglo-Saxon church and cemetery.

Source & Full Story

Police Baffled By 144-Year-Old Gravestone of Infant that mMysteriously Appeared in a Backyard Nearly 200 Miles from Cemetery

Police in Indiana have spent the past 12 years puzzling over a 19th-century tombstone that somehow ended up in a resident's backyard. With the help of social media and an enterprising Good Samaritan, the Greenwood Police Department now has come one step closer to solving the mystery.

In June 2002, a Greenwood woman was digging in her garden when she stumbled upon a 144-year-old gravestone.

Source & Full Story

Woman Receives WWI Love Letters 95 Years After They Were Written To Her Grandmother

An Oregon woman is now discovering the love that blossomed nearly a century ago between her grandmother and grandfather, all thanks to the kind determination of a total stranger.

It all started in 1918 when Nathan Byrd, serving in the military in France, wrote 25 letters to his wife Lota Byrd at home in Phoenix, Arizona. The story might have ended there, until a woman named Sheryl Caliguire found Nathan's letters to Lota in a Southern California car port 30 years ago, and held on to them all this time.

Source & Full Story

World War Two Skeletons Washed from Marshall Islands Graves 'By Rising Seas'

The skeletons of 26 Japanese soldiers who died during World War II have been washed from their graves in the low-lying Marshall Islands, prompting warnings by the nation that its future is under threat from rising sea levels.

The nation of 70,000 people revealed the extent of the devastation during United Nations climate change talks in Germany, saying global warming was ruining crops and that sea rises were overrunning parts of the islands. The nation’s 1,000-plus islands are only about six feet above sea level – and scientists are predicting a three- to six-foot rise in sea levels by the end of the century.

Source & Full Story

Do You Know The Geneanet Facebook Page?

If you would like to keep in touch with Geneanet, find out about news, events, upcoming services and options, and much more, then why not check out our Facebook page?

If you need help with your family history research, you can also post your question there.

Click the following link to join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Geneanet.en

You can also follow Geneanet on:
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6 June 2014

The Importance of Maps in Genealogical Research

Mary Girard, local genealogist and historian, knows the importance of maps, especially when it comes to tracking down early settlers.

Maps that provide various kinds of information from the location of waterways, roads to settlements in the early days in Kentucky can easily be found. All the early maps from the formation of the state and counties shows how each county changed over time and they can be found online on the Kentucky State Secretary Land Office in Frankfort.

Source & Full Story

5 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Ancestral Quest 14.20 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Check Repair: Made improvements to find and fix some additional issues.
• Translations: Added some comments to some abbreviated labels to help translators with the translations.
• Web Page Creation: When creating a web page, if you asked for living descendants, but wanted to show "Living" rather than the name, this worked fine for the descendant, but if a spouse was living, it showed the name of spouse. Fixed. Now shows "living" for a living spouse.
• Book Reports: If you had pictures for people, there was a small chance that the page break would lose a few words. Fixed.

Branches for iPad 1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Adjusted fonts and minor layout changes.
• Added ability to load more non-standard GEDCOMS.
• Speed up of GEDCOM analysis and loading.

Brother's Keeper 7.0.18 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Sometimes on Edit, if you Rearrange Spouses, the spouse names would not show until you stop BK and restart BK. This update fixes that problem.

My Family Tree 3.0.19.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Updated translations.
• Fixed issue saving LDS facts.

Chester Nez, Last of Original Navajo Code Talkers of World War II, Dies

For more than two decades, Chester Nez kept silent about his role as one of the original Navajo code talkers responsible for developing an unbreakable code during World War II.

His death Wednesday at his home in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at age 93 was lamented by the Marine Corps as the end of an era -- for both the country and its armed forces. "We mourn his passing but honor and celebrate the indomitable spirit and dedication of those Marines who became known as the Navajo code talkers," the Marines said in a statement.

Source & Full Story

Oldest Known Pair of Pants Unearthed

The world’s first-known pants were recently excavated from tombs in western China, reports a new study.

The pants, which date from 3,000 to 3,300 years ago, are tattered, but are surprisingly stylish, combining attractive form with function. Made out of wool, the trousers feature straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch. The pants were discovered in an excavation led by archaeologists Ulrike Beck and Mayke Wagner of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin.

Source & Full Story

4 June 2014

Then and Now in Pictures: 70 Years Later, Normandy's Beaches Retain Memory of D-Day Invasion

As many around the world prepare to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings of June 6, 1944, pictures of Normandy's now-touristy beaches stand in stark contrast to images taken around the time of the invasion.

But while the landscape has changed, the memory of the momentous event lives on.

Source & Pictures

Gravestone Girls Preserve Cemetery Art

The next time you pass by a cemetery, stop and look at the gravestones because the dead are trying to tell you something and remind you that, one day, you will also take the long dirt nap.

Gravestone Girls co-founder Brenda J. Sullivan is helping keep the dead alive. She, along with Gravestone Girls Maggie White and Melissa Anderson, travel all over New England preserving cemetery art and history and giving presentations.

Source & Full Story

Auction of Civil War Soldier's Skull Found at Gettysburg Canceled

An auction company late Monday canceled plans to sell the skull of a Civil War soldier and military items found near Gettysburg, Pa.

After facing mounting criticism, the Estate Auction Company, which had hoped the skull would sell for between $50,000 and $250,000, will instead hand over the skull to the Gettysburg National Military Park, auctioneer Thomas Taylor said. Katie Lawhon, spokeswoman for Gettysburg National Military Park, had described the proposed sale as "very unfortunate.”

Source & Full Story

3 June 2014

Genetic Genealogy: Looking For the Faces of Our Ancestors in DNA

Today we can all look online to find out who our ancestors were, and soon geneticists hope that DNA can show us their faces as well.

Mark Shriver, Professor of Anthropology and Genetics at Pennsylvania State University, and Peter Claes from the University of Leuwen in Belgium, have been working for four years on the genetics of facial features, meaning the relation between genetic sequences, facial traits and skin tones.

Source & Full Story

2 June 2014

Remains of Five World War I Soldiers Found in France

The remains of five French soldiers who fought in World War I have been found along with their weapons in a wood in the country's east, a man behind the discovery said on Sunday.

The skeletons were discovered along with Lebel rifles, the basic weapon of the French infantry during the Great War, in a forest near the town of Luneville, Philippe Sugg told AFP. One of them had his identity tag and was a 27-year-old from an area near the southern city of Perpignan, he said.

Source & Full Story

Medieval Skulls Found in Coventry's Old Grammar School

Fragments of medieval skulls and bones have been found during the restoration of a 12th Century building in Coventry. The bones found in the Old Grammar School are believed to date back to some time between the 12th and 16th Centuries.

The excavation of the Grade I listed building is part of an £8.5m scheme to restore the building and extend the neighbouring Transport Museum. Experts described the finds as "surprising".

Source & Full Story

Unique Silk Cloth Found in Emperor Henry VII's Coffin

A unique silk cloth has been found in the tomb of German king and Holy Roman emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg (1275-1313), among bones and what remains of his boiled head, Italian researchers announced this week.

Resting in Pisa Cathedral, the remains of Henry VII were exhumed last fall with the aim of getting more insights into the emperor’s physical features and cause of death. The research is still ongoing, but the opening of the sarcophagus has already revealed a medieval treasure trove.

Source & Full Story

Skeletons of 800 Babies, Infants Believed To Be Buried at Bon Secours Sisters Site in Ireland

A woman with a dark secret has revealed why the skeletons of about 800 infants and children are believed to be in a disused septic tank.

The site in Tuam 32km north of Galway City, Ireland, is located at what was The Home, a home for unmarried mothers, run by the Bon Secours Sisters — a Roman Catholic religious order of nuns that today operates in US, Ireland, Peru, France, and Great Britain — from the 1920s until the 1960s, Irish Mail on Sunday reported.

Source & Full Story

Nat'l Archives Unveils List of Koreans Killed After 1923 Quake in Japan

South Korea's national archives released Monday a list of some of the Korean victims killed by Japan after a powerful earthquake in Japan in 1923.

The list includes the names and addresses of 318 Koreans massacred by Japan following the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake in Japan as well as the circumstances under which the victims were killed, according to the National Archives of Korea.

Source & Full Story

Genealogy and Headstones: Participate!

Geneanet has a big collection of pictures of headstones and memorials.

These pictures are shared for free by the Geneanet members.

When you are looking for an individual in the Geneanet database, the search engine can return pictures of headstones and memorials if they are indexed.

Take a few moments to play your part and index some pictures!

Continue reading...